The dark side of our personal marketing data

We all know advertisers on the internet are stalking us, but Kirk Grogan shows us that marketers now have the power to change not just our buying behaviors, but our beliefs. Grogan argues that we’ve passed a point of no return and the same technologies used to guide us to buy our favorite sneakers can and are being used to mold and recruit extremists. Kirk Grogan is a marketing and sales strategist in Seattle. He had considered a career in international intelligence after growing up with a father who worked on spy satellites for the Defense Department. At Texas Tech, he added a minor in Arabic to his international business major to boost his appeal to intelligence agencies, even studied at the American University in Dubai. But a year spent abroad changed his perspective. When he saw how people in different countries receive drastically different news and information, he began to see parallels in his world of data marketing. He now consults with Fortune 100 companies. He coaches and leads marketing teams to develop conversion testing methods and teaches them how to engage with potential customers in an organic environment. He has developed multiple unique strategies currently implemented across the business world to help brands connect and build loyalty with consumers.


The power of embodying new personas

barry johnson believes that when you fully immerse yourself in a new persona, you grow into a richer, better version of yourself. As a teenager inspired by superheroes, johnson embraced a new persona to help him confront a family tragedy. Today, he continues to embody new versions of himself to take on challenges and make drastic career shifts -– and encourages us to do the same. barry johnson is multidisciplinary artist whose work, which ranges from painting to filmmaking to installations, has appeared in more than 70 shows around the world. He is also a children’s book author and illustrator and in his free time he volunteers teaching art to all ages. He is known for constantly shifting the nature of his work. A self-taught artist, he grew up in Kansas and, after graduating with a Business Marketing degree, relocated to Seattle. He moved into the tech and consulting industries but became disillusioned with the lack of imagination in tech design requests. Johnson left the tech world to become a full time artist and has been making art for six years. Currently, he is working on opening a new show featuring a few temporary murals and has just finished writing a film that will begin shooting the summer of 2019. He is the recipient of an Edwin T. Pratt Scholarship for 2018-2019. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


Using AI to transform the lives of the blind

Phone apps make everyone’s lives easier, but for members of the blind community, a new seeing AI app transforms how they live and work every day. Anirudh Koul believes that any disability is merely a gap between what we want to do and what we can do, and it’s technology’s role to fill those gaps. Koul points out that we all experience gaps as we age, and his invention gives all hope for a more empowered future. Growing up in India, Anirudh Kuhl was programming computers at a young age and by high school he was captivated by patterns in data—a key component of artificial intelligence. He moved to the United States to study at Carnegie Mellon and after stints at Yahoo and Microsoft, is now an AI researcher with multiple patents. Driven by his desire to help a dear family member, he took on a hackathon challenge at Microsoft and led development of an app that is now helping hundreds of millions of people with disabilities. It literally puts the gift of sight in their hands. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


Back of the room at The Riveter as the audience watches TEDxSeattleLive on the large screen

TEDxSeattleLive: Watching TED 2018 "The Age of Amazement"

 

To introduce TED2018, TED owner Chris Anderson and TED Head of Curation Helen Walters asked the audience to complete a simple task: to turn to someone whom they didn’t know and state what, over the last year, the main emotion is that they’ve felt. In Seattle, the crowd that was gathered at TEDxSeattleLive followed suit. Strangers exchanged quick greetings and with just a few minutes for the exercise began sharing their hope—and fears—from the past year.  Looking from the back of the audience during TEDxSeattleLive 2018 held at The Riveter

While there was plenty of apprehension in the crowd, there was also hope for what the next year would bring despite an increasingly divisive global culture. Seattle has long been known as a city filled with forward-thinking innovation and passion for change, so it’s no surprise a day full of learning and inspiration was met with such an openness to how an idea can shape the future.

The event screened two different sessions over the course of the day: “Doom. Gloom. Outrage. Uproar.” then “Wow. Just wow.” Between the two sessions, the audience listened to topics ranging from the #MeToo movement by Tracee Ellis Ross, to how artificial intelligence can upheave the job market as we know it today by Kai-Fu Lee.


How traveling at the speed of a bullet will change a region's culture

Hyperloop technology will allow travel at the speed of a commercial jet on the ground. What happens when cities like Seattle and Portland – three hours apart by car – are suddenly a 20-minute pod ride apart?

Charlie Swan, student and Hyperloop proponent, believes the new commuter option could do more than relieve traffic congestion and redistribute housing prices across a region. Swan argues the speed of connection will transform culture and even sense of personal identity for the people along its path. Charlie Swan, co-founder of Pacific Hyperloop, is a senior at the University of Washington pursuing undergraduate degrees in Economics and Entrepreneurship. Out of over 2600 applicants worldwide, Pacific Hyperloop represents the region as 1 of 12 semi-finalists in the Hyperloop One Global Challenge. As head of Regional Engagement & Economic Development at Pacific Hyperloop, Charlie has engaged with organizations across the business and engineering spectrum as well as evaluating the economic and cultural implications of a Seattle to Portland hyperloop route on an urban and regional scale. He routinely communicates about hyperloop to public and private stakeholders, and is navigating partnerships with local industry and policy-makers.


Virtual reality can be a powerful tool for understanding each other

Virtual Reality is a work in progress, says Sandy Cioffi, and she outlines exciting ways VR is being used to experience "the other," to virtually "walk in someone else’s shoes."

Artists as using immersive media, to create new narratives that would allow you to put on a high-tech headset and feel what it’s like to float down the Amazon river, experience life as a different gender, or scatter in the wake of destruction on a Syrian street. With examples of some of the most exciting work going on in this new media, Sandy argues that VR can provide a seismically new way to understand ourselves and, in the end, give us a greater understanding of what it is to be human. Sandy Cioffi was the Director of SIFFX, the Seattle film festival's celebration of virtual reality and immersive filmmaking and is currently director of the New Media and Virtual Reality X Fair coming in 2018. As a filmmaker, Sandy has worked with human rights organizations in global hot zones and has worked extensively with Hate Free Zone (now One America) producing films about treatment of immigrants post-September 11th. In 2005-2008, Sandy traveled to the volatile Niger Delta in Nigeria to film "Sweet Crude," documenting conditions and interviewing the region’s key stakeholders, including leadership of the armed resistance movement. She has been active in political advocacy for the Delta’s people, appealing to media, U.S. legislators, international diplomats, and NGOs. Sandy has worked as an artist-in-residence at many middle and high schools in Washington State and through the mentor/apprentice film program at the Langston Hughes Cultural Arts Center. She was the founder and Director/Chair of Film + Media at Cornish College of the Arts. Currently, Sandy is directing a non-fiction media project with CREA, a feminist human rights organization. She is the co-founder and Creative Director of the start-up fearless360º creating immersive media and education events around the world. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


Disease eradication is within reach

Steve Davis is working to bring an extraordinary vision to reality—the global elimination of some of the world’s most deadly and debilitating diseases.

Davis is the president and CEO of PATH, a 40-year-old, Seattle-based, global health-focused, non-governmental organization which works on vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system/service innovations. In this talk, Davis lays out the “how to” of disease elimination calling on his diverse experience as a former human-rights lawyer, a nationally-recognized technology business innovator and social activist. Steve Davis, president and CEO of PATH, combines extensive experience as a technology business leader, global health advocate, and social innovator to accelerate great ideas and bring lifesaving solutions to scale. Prior to joining PATH in 2012, he served as director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company, CEO of the global digital media firm, Corbis, interim director of the Infectious Disease Research Institute, and he practiced law at the international law firm K&L Gates. Earlier, he worked extensively on refugee programs and policies, and Chinese politics and law. Mr. Davis is a lecturer on social innovation at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He currently is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, serves on the board of InterAction, and sits on several advisory groups, including the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Social Innovation and the Clinton Global Initiative’s Global Health Advisory Board. He also serves as a trustee of the World Economic Forum’s Global Health Challenge. Mr. Davis earned his BA from Princeton University, his MA in Chinese studies from the University of Washington, and his law degree from Columbia University. He also studied at Beijing University.


Artificial Intelligence will empower us, not exterminate us

Artificial Intelligence advocate Oren Etzioni makes a case for the life-saving benefits of AI used wisely to improve our way of life. Acknowledging growing fears about AI’s potential for abuse of power, he asks us to consider how to responsibly balance our desire for greater intelligence and autonomy with the risks inherent in this new and growing technology.


Let’s make connectivity mobile — by heading to space

Access to the internet has changed the world, but with expectations in the next 15 year of 30 billion connected devices, we are facing a connectivity crisis. The ONLY option for meeting the increased demand for bandwidth is to go to space and we have the technology to get us there.


Our best hope in fighting global disease is open collaboration

Alexis is a research biologist, but her experience in engineering school and social justice issues before grad school has made her a scientist who looks at social and economic constraints as a path to creativity. She has implemented innovative techniques and made some startling discoveries in the quest for a malaria cure, discoveries that might help us fight other infectious diseases as well.


Discover the Dream of Flight at iFLY!

The fun begins bright and early with a STEM seminar and Lab hosted by iFLY Seattle‘s own Ralph Tolle (retired NASA & US Air Force). We will cover everything from wind speed dynamics and terminal velocity all the way to the unique engineering that makes human flight a reality in our vertical wind tunnel.

After we’ve had a chance to discuss the science behind iFLY it’s time to step into the experiment and take a flight in wind speeds of up to 200 miles per hour! This is sure to be a fun, exciting and memorable experience for students and people of all ages.

When: Saturday, October 15th, 9am to 12pm

Where: Meet at iFly 349 Tukwila Pkwy, Tukwila, WA 98188

Who: All Ages (adults and kids – fun to be had by all!)

Cost: $40