Why you should not bring your authentic self to work

In this 2020 TEDxSeattle talk, Jodi-Ann Burey explores the nuances of what professionals of color and other underrepresented groups face when they are told to “bring your authentic self to work.” Many who do so may face backlash when navigating company cultures designed around white privilege, exposing themselves to penalties for not conforming to the dominant culture. Burey calls for people of color and other underrepresented people to focus their energies on realizing their own imaginations for racial justice on their terms. Separately, Burey outlines steps toward achieving more equitable and just workplaces, and implores company leadership and people with privilege to accept accountability for changing their cultures.
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What white people can do to move race conversations forward

In this 2020 TEDxSeattle talk, Dr. Caprice Hollins explains why we often fail to have productive conversations about race, race relations, and racism in this country. Her talk sheds light on why People of Color and White people take different approaches to these conversations and what White people can do to move race conversations forward.

With over twenty years of experience leading and facilitating conversations on race, Dr. Hollins uses current events and daily moments as teaching opportunities about race relations in America today. 

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The key to the future of food

In this 2020 TEDxSeattle talk, Audra Mulkern shares her journey to put female farmers back in the picture. She wants to help them mow down the “grass ceiling” and drive the agricultural industry forward.

Audra explains how female farmers have fed the nation in times of crisis - despite having harder times accessing loans and credit. Foregoing pie charts and graphs for photographs and personal stories, her talk demonstrates why the “grass ceiling” should be a concern for all of us.

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TEDxSeattleWomen 2020: Fearless

Thanks for tuning in to this year’s event!
If you missed it, check out the live stream recording below and sign up for updates to learn about upcoming events!

New year.
New format.
Same inspiring content.

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This complimentary and virtual event will center on the theme of Fearless – an idea that is exceedingly important during this time of apart-ness and physical, cultural and economic challenges. Don’t miss out on the chance to hear remarkable talks, watch stories of “Women Who Dare” and call upon our collective fearlessness to take a global step forward – together.

We are prioritizing connection. With our community top of mind, TEDxSeattleWomen welcomes you to join other attendees in breakout discussions, Community Conversations, during the event. Subject to availability.


Meet our host

Jeannie Yandel is a special projects editor at KUOW Public Radio in Seattle, where she works on everything from podcasts to special broadcast series to live events.

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#TEDxSEATTLE 
#FEARLESS2020

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Thank you to our presenting partner:

Special thank you to the sponsors who enable us to share the ideas worth spreading:

See 2019 TEDxSeattleWomen highlights

This event is licensed by TEDWomen.


Turning adversaries into allies

Leah Garcés wants to eliminate chicken factory farming. The problem is, to make progress, she’ll have to collaborate with her adversary – the chicken farmer. In today’s polarized environment, an “us vs. them” mentality is rampant. Leah challenges that narrative reminding us that we can learn valuable lessons from unlikely allies and that bold, innovative changes to make our food system more sustainable can only happen when we work toward win-win solutions.

Leah Garces is President of the nonprofit Mercy For Animals, one of the world’s largest farmed animal rights organizations and leads a team of 130 staff globally.

“At this point in the history of human society, we’re very polarized. My theory of change is that if we’re going to move the world to a better more compassionate food system, instead of trying to beat down the enemy, we need to sit down with them and have them join us.” On any given day, whether Leah is flying to meet with business executives to discuss moving their company to more plant-based offerings or speaking at a conference about her radical theory of change, she’s ultimately advocating for a win-win between corporate ideals and improving the lives of animals. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx


Improving gender parity through corporate accountability

Sara Sanford has long heard women colleagues and friends telling stories of unequal treatment at work. She realized systemic problems cannot be changed through individuals’ actions. Applying the approach of “you get the behavior you measure,” she founded Gender Equity Now and developed a set of tools that are unparalleled in the United States. This framework identifies the gaps, applies small changes and certifies business to close the gender parity. She looks forward to the day when companies which are not gender equity-focused will be at a competitive disadvantage to those which are. Sara Sanford founded Gender Equity Now (GEN) to bring gender balance to the U.S. workplace. She is the architect behind the GEN Certification, the first gold standard for gender parity in U.S. businesses. Guided by the maxim, “You get the behavior you measure,” Sara believes we now have the data-driven tools for all businesses to be equity-centered if they choose to be. Before starting GEN, Sara worked in the financial services industry, where she identified opportunities to address gender disparities as a force multiplier for growth. As a Masters graduate of the University of Washington Evans School of Public Policy, Sara focused on private-public partnerships and impact evaluation in the international development sector. She has since used her experience and skills to collaborate with Local and International Foundations in the areas of education, cultural competence, sustainability, and global health.


A Prosecutor's Case Against Equality

Criminal justice reform depends on our willingness to reexamine fundamental principles. Pursuing equity, rather than equality, would produce more just and more effective outcomes.


Poetry to set hearts on fire

“I write poetry from my own experiences,” says Anastacia-Reneé, “and to make those experiences tangible for others to help create change.” In this powerful reading, Seattle Civic Poet Anastacia-Reneé invites us into her version of “the talk” that people of color feel bound to share with their sons as they walk out in the world — a world where being young, and brown can too easily get you shot. Her second poem, brings us back to the everyday world of raising children who often ask the toughest questions, including, “do I matter?” Anastacia-Reneé is a writer, performance artist, and workshop facilitator who has been described as a queer super-shero of color. She is the 2018-2019 Seattle Civic Poet, the 2015-2017 Poet-in-Residence at Hugo House and the recipient of the 2017 Artist of the Year Award. She is the author of five books and her cross-genre writing has appeared in: Women of Resistance; Poems for a New Feminism. Sinister Wisdom; Black Lesbians—We Are the Revolution and many more. She has received writing fellowships from Cave Canem, Hedgebrook, VONA, Artist Trust and Jack Straw, as well as a writing residency from Ragdale and Mineral School. She grabs time to write whenever possible which as the mother of two children and a teacher of three programs, is usually between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. “When poetry takes center stage, tension-filled spaces become safe literary hubs where community members can gather to share and celebrate the plethora of local, historical, and contemporary voices” says Anastacia-Reneé. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


TEDxSeattleSalon: Becoming Thought Leaders

TEDxSeattle speakers who have brought innovation to the fields of business and medicine, through non-standard approaches, will share how they did it during this mid-week evening discussion.

Maura O'Neill, the former Chief of Innovation for the U.S. Agency for International Development (a role she developed in the Obama administration) is a serial entrepreneur, instructor, and researcher on the topic of "narrow-mindedness" and its effect on science, medicine, business, and government. She was also a featured speaker at TEDxRainier in 2015. That presentation is linked, below.

Mónica Guzmán is a journalist reinventing media as a way for Seattleites to better connect. She is also the co-founder and director of  The Evergrey, a new community media newsletter and platform that helps us, "Live like you live here." Prior to The Evergrey, Mónica was a columnist at the Seattle Times, GeekWire, The Daily Beast the the Columbia Journalism Review.

Mavis Tsai is a UW research scientist and clinical psychologist, and the founder of a new movement to increase deep social connections. This movement is spreading through cities on a global scale, led by facilitators whom she trains on learnings based on her research. Her work creates more accessible ways to provide meaningful connections at an affordable scale for all people, worldwide. For a sneak peek, you can also check out her previous talk at TEDxEverett

When you purchase a ticket, you can expect an interesting and interactive discussion of thought leadership and innovation.

 

 


Creating Home: A Conversation at Mary's Place

Join us at Mary's Place for a unique tour and conversation.

Mary's Place is a nonprofit organization operating in King County to addressing homelessness and empower homeless women, children, and families to reclaim their lives by providing emergency shelter, nourishment, housing & employment resources. Listen and participate in a community conversation on family homelessness and policy reform in Seattle/King County. We will share a spectrum of viewpoints - including those from Mary’s Place, the City of Seattle, Seattle Public Schools, and families experiencing homelessness - to develop, analyze, and suggest policy solutions that address homelessness.


Blue jeans or blue water? Fashion powering conservation around the world

Most people don't link high fashion with the conservation movement but Ava Holmes founded Fashion for Conservation (FFC) to do exactly that.

Ava and her team of industry-leading fashion professionals and her colleagues in the conservation movement have been raising awareness as well as funds by producing wildlife-inspired fashion campaigns and hosting events at Fashion Weeks around the world such as Elephantasia, a campaign to help protect African elephants, And now Elephantasia can be seen as part of TEDxSeattle in the first fashion show included in a TEDx talk. Inspired by her film producer mother and by her father, an instructor in outdoor survival skills, Ava grew up with a deep love of nature as well as beautiful art. A noted producer, Holmes’ career in fashion has always been influenced by her connection to nature, so combining her interests in fashion and conservation became an obvious choice. Eschewing traditional fashion production because of its excessive waste, Holmes decided fashion should be the solution to its own problem and created Fashion for Conservation. It’s working. Her nature-inspired approach to fashion is featured on the catwalk in fashion weeks worldwide as well as in mainstream media, reaching non-traditional audiences with a message of conservation. Fashion for Conservation now funds a variety of innovative conservation projects in threatened ecosystems around the world.


Setting scientific research free

The results from taxpayer-funded, scientific research are often locked behind a paywall.

Jennifer Hansen, a senior officer in Knowledge and Research at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, says the cost of accessing that data is too high. Limiting access to the research results in social inequity and puts human lives at risk. She argues that the current model of research distribution is overdue for disruption. Hansen says it’s time to foster a scientific revolution through open access to data. Jennifer Hansen is an equity advocate with a fierce dedication to ensuring information and scientific knowledge is free and available to all. Her professional career has revolved around closing the digital divide and inspiring others to believe in the power of knowledge to shape their world. Ms. Hansen currently works at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as the Senior Officer for Knowledge & Research. She drives the strategy development and management of the foundation’s research outputs and is an influencer in shaping the future of scholarly communication. She championed and led the implementation of the Foundation’s groundbreaking Open Access Policy – a policy requiring that all its funded published research be immediately available to everyone, everywhere without barrier or restriction. Nature called the bold action to open up scholarly research the”world’s strongest policy on open access research.” And, The Economist described it as “something that may help to change the practice of science.”