The Future of Pain Relief

Using virtual reality (VR) to treat pain has delivered exciting results, thanks to research conducted by Dr. Sam Sharar. A professor of anesthesiology and pain medicine at the University of Washington, Sam explains how “pain is all in our heads”: our physical, cognitive, and emotional reactions in the brain combine to tell us we are experiencing pain. The reality of pain is entirely variable, unpredictable, and different for each person, making it hard to manage. Hearing the success of VR in other fields, Sam is now exploring the impact of applying VR to burn patients in an effort to alleviate the excruciating pain of their necessary treatments. The results of his studies are compelling. Getting relief from pain could come from leveraging the brain’s ability to leave the reality of pain for another reality that encourages healing—a promising concept across the field of medicine. Sam Sharar, MD, refers to himself as “an academic anesthesiologist.” He is a board-certified anesthesiologist and cares for seriously injured children and adults at Harborview Medical Center. He is also a Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at The University of Washington. Dr. Sharar teaches and advises medical students as a College Faculty Mentor and is Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Development of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine. Additionally, he is the Associate Medical Director for King County Medic 1, where he provides training to paramedics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx


TEDxSeattleSalon: Becoming Thought Leaders

TEDxSeattle speakers who have brought innovation to the fields of business and medicine, through non-standard approaches, will share how they did it during this mid-week evening discussion.

Maura O'Neill, the former Chief of Innovation for the U.S. Agency for International Development (a role she developed in the Obama administration) is a serial entrepreneur, instructor, and researcher on the topic of "narrow-mindedness" and its effect on science, medicine, business, and government. She was also a featured speaker at TEDxRainier in 2015. That presentation is linked, below.

Mónica Guzmán is a journalist reinventing media as a way for Seattleites to better connect. She is also the co-founder and director of  The Evergrey, a new community media newsletter and platform that helps us, "Live like you live here." Prior to The Evergrey, Mónica was a columnist at the Seattle Times, GeekWire, The Daily Beast the the Columbia Journalism Review.

Mavis Tsai is a UW research scientist and clinical psychologist, and the founder of a new movement to increase deep social connections. This movement is spreading through cities on a global scale, led by facilitators whom she trains on learnings based on her research. Her work creates more accessible ways to provide meaningful connections at an affordable scale for all people, worldwide. For a sneak peek, you can also check out her previous talk at TEDxEverett

When you purchase a ticket, you can expect an interesting and interactive discussion of thought leadership and innovation.

 

 


Disease eradication is within reach

Steve Davis is working to bring an extraordinary vision to reality—the global elimination of some of the world’s most deadly and debilitating diseases.

Davis is the president and CEO of PATH, a 40-year-old, Seattle-based, global health-focused, non-governmental organization which works on vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system/service innovations. In this talk, Davis lays out the “how to” of disease elimination calling on his diverse experience as a former human-rights lawyer, a nationally-recognized technology business innovator and social activist. Steve Davis, president and CEO of PATH, combines extensive experience as a technology business leader, global health advocate, and social innovator to accelerate great ideas and bring lifesaving solutions to scale. Prior to joining PATH in 2012, he served as director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company, CEO of the global digital media firm, Corbis, interim director of the Infectious Disease Research Institute, and he practiced law at the international law firm K&L Gates. Earlier, he worked extensively on refugee programs and policies, and Chinese politics and law. Mr. Davis is a lecturer on social innovation at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He currently is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, serves on the board of InterAction, and sits on several advisory groups, including the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Social Innovation and the Clinton Global Initiative’s Global Health Advisory Board. He also serves as a trustee of the World Economic Forum’s Global Health Challenge. Mr. Davis earned his BA from Princeton University, his MA in Chinese studies from the University of Washington, and his law degree from Columbia University. He also studied at Beijing University.


Our best hope in fighting global disease is open collaboration

Alexis is a research biologist, but her experience in engineering school and social justice issues before grad school has made her a scientist who looks at social and economic constraints as a path to creativity. She has implemented innovative techniques and made some startling discoveries in the quest for a malaria cure, discoveries that might help us fight other infectious diseases as well.


Surviving Cancer: The Biology of Luck

Why are some people "cured" of cancer while others deal with relapses? Answering that question may mean changing the way we think about the disease.