Setting scientific research free

The results from taxpayer-funded, scientific research are often locked behind a paywall.

Jennifer Hansen, a senior officer in Knowledge and Research at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, says the cost of accessing that data is too high. Limiting access to the research results in social inequity and puts human lives at risk. She argues that the current model of research distribution is overdue for disruption. Hansen says it’s time to foster a scientific revolution through open access to data. Jennifer Hansen is an equity advocate with a fierce dedication to ensuring information and scientific knowledge is free and available to all. Her professional career has revolved around closing the digital divide and inspiring others to believe in the power of knowledge to shape their world. Ms. Hansen currently works at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as the Senior Officer for Knowledge & Research. She drives the strategy development and management of the foundation’s research outputs and is an influencer in shaping the future of scholarly communication. She championed and led the implementation of the Foundation’s groundbreaking Open Access Policy – a policy requiring that all its funded published research be immediately available to everyone, everywhere without barrier or restriction. Nature called the bold action to open up scholarly research the”world’s strongest policy on open access research.” And, The Economist described it as “something that may help to change the practice of science.”


Everyone has a song - welcoming refugees through music

What started as a place to sing became a refuge.

Founded by Erin Guinup, just as the U.S. was closing its borders to citizens from select countries, the Tacoma Refugee Choir was determined to turn its musical practice into a celebration of human connection by welcoming voices from around the world. The Choir has created an original song to showcase the idea that it takes diversity to create true harmony. Featuring vocals by Wanz, QDot and Stephanie Anne Johnson.


How traveling at the speed of a bullet will change a region's culture

Hyperloop technology will allow travel at the speed of a commercial jet on the ground. What happens when cities like Seattle and Portland – three hours apart by car – are suddenly a 20-minute pod ride apart?

Charlie Swan, student and Hyperloop proponent, believes the new commuter option could do more than relieve traffic congestion and redistribute housing prices across a region. Swan argues the speed of connection will transform culture and even sense of personal identity for the people along its path. Charlie Swan, co-founder of Pacific Hyperloop, is a senior at the University of Washington pursuing undergraduate degrees in Economics and Entrepreneurship. Out of over 2600 applicants worldwide, Pacific Hyperloop represents the region as 1 of 12 semi-finalists in the Hyperloop One Global Challenge. As head of Regional Engagement & Economic Development at Pacific Hyperloop, Charlie has engaged with organizations across the business and engineering spectrum as well as evaluating the economic and cultural implications of a Seattle to Portland hyperloop route on an urban and regional scale. He routinely communicates about hyperloop to public and private stakeholders, and is navigating partnerships with local industry and policy-makers.


Northwest Tap Connection on the TEDxSeattle 2017 stage

Dance as protest; say their names see their names feel their names

Using a combination of live performance and their viral-sensation video of the protest dance “Hell You Talmbout”, these Northwest Tap Connection students work to heighten awareness about black individuals killed by police.  Movement is power and these young people have the power to move us all.


A powerful strategy for disrupting child trafficking

Patty Haven Fleischmann is successfully combating child trafficking in Seattle and catalyzing similar nationwide efforts.

As a therapist, child of a Holocaust survivor, and “kid advocate,” Fleischmann uses her ability to hold two opposing truths to attract a diverse and committed community and disrupt a seemingly insurmountable problem. Launching a Seattle-based non-profit which has raised $4.5 million to fund local organizations that combat both supply and demand, Fleischmann is galvanizing the community and driving a national conversation.   A licensed marriage and family therapist of 25+ years, Patty is the co-founder and President of the StolenYouth board. StolenYouth’s mission is to support the rescue and recovery of our community’s sexually exploited youth. Patty and StolenYouth have worked tirelessly to build a unique coalition of organizations fighting trafficking on all fronts. Since then, these organizations have pioneered new ways to disrupt the scope and nature of child trafficking. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


Disease eradication is within reach

Steve Davis is working to bring an extraordinary vision to reality—the global elimination of some of the world’s most deadly and debilitating diseases.

Davis is the president and CEO of PATH, a 40-year-old, Seattle-based, global health-focused, non-governmental organization which works on vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system/service innovations. In this talk, Davis lays out the “how to” of disease elimination calling on his diverse experience as a former human-rights lawyer, a nationally-recognized technology business innovator and social activist. Steve Davis, president and CEO of PATH, combines extensive experience as a technology business leader, global health advocate, and social innovator to accelerate great ideas and bring lifesaving solutions to scale. Prior to joining PATH in 2012, he served as director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company, CEO of the global digital media firm, Corbis, interim director of the Infectious Disease Research Institute, and he practiced law at the international law firm K&L Gates. Earlier, he worked extensively on refugee programs and policies, and Chinese politics and law. Mr. Davis is a lecturer on social innovation at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He currently is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, serves on the board of InterAction, and sits on several advisory groups, including the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Social Innovation and the Clinton Global Initiative’s Global Health Advisory Board. He also serves as a trustee of the World Economic Forum’s Global Health Challenge. Mr. Davis earned his BA from Princeton University, his MA in Chinese studies from the University of Washington, and his law degree from Columbia University. He also studied at Beijing University.


We're drowning in BS, but you can learn how to fight back

Jevin West is not afraid to call out bullshit for what it is and wants to teach us how to do the same.

West is an assistant professor and co-creator of a new course, “Calling BS: data reasoning in a digital world” at the University of Washington. In this engaging talk, West shows how dangerous and misleading some news stories can be and warns that while BS is fairly easy to create, it’s harder to clean up, especially when shared relentlessly on social media. Jevin D. West is an Assistant Professor in the Information School at the University of Washington. He co-founded the DataLab, a collection of faculty and graduate students focused on research in Data Curation, Computational Social Science, Data for Social Good, Information Visualization and the Science of Science. He is one of the chief architects of the new Data Science curricula for undergraduate and graduate programs at UW. Together with Carl Bergstrom, he developed the Calling Bullshit course to help the public refute the onslaught of misinformation in today’s digital and data-driven environments. The course is being adopted at universities and high schools around the world. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


Use the power of your diversity

As Vice President of Marketing for Boeing, Fariba Alamdari is the picture of success.

But the hurdles to achieve this have been many: being raised in a culture that prizes males, being an Iranian in Western society, and one of few women in the aerospace field. Despite the naysayers, Alamdari has continued to believe that being a woman and immigrant makes her a major asset — a belief affirmed when Boeing promoted her twice before she had even accepted their offer. For Alamdari, success starts with embracing your own diversity, and knowing the value you bring to your organization and community. Fariba Alamdari is Vice president, Marketing at the Boeing Commercial Airplanes. She joined Boeing from Cranfield University in the United Kingdom, where she served as chair of the university’s Department of Air Transport, and Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Manufacturing and Science. She has published extensively on aviation-related issues. Fariba is a strong advocate of diversity and is a speaker at diversity forums. She believes in a compassionate leadership style focused on achieving results based on trust and respect for all. She is the recipient of several awards including: “Woman of the Year” by Air Transport News in 2016, “Ellis Island Medal of Honor” from The National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations (NECO) in 2016, “Leadership Award” from the Centre for Women & Democracy in 2015, the “Professional Award” from Career Communication Group, Inc in 2011. She is married, and has a son and a daughter. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.


Kids sue the government to fight climate change-- and win

As a high school student, Aji Piper joined with other students in the fight to combat global warming.

Together, they sued the Washington State Department of Ecology and won a ruling to enact new regulatory standards. Now, they are taking their fight to the next level by challenging the Federal government. Piper believes that the future is here today in the voices of the young and that children have a role to play in guiding policy for the planet they will inherit. Aji Piper,17, grew up in the woods of the Kitsap Peninsula in Washington. From his upbringing Aji developed a deep love and connection to the forest and waters of the Pacific Northwest. His activism began when he learned about oil trains coming through his city and along the coast and he was driven to take part in protests and legislative hearings. He uses songs he wrote and his ukulele to speak about environmental issues. He also serves his community by sitting on the Earth Guardians national RYSE council and serving as the President of Plant for the Planet a nonprofit dedicated to fighting climate change through planting trees.


TEDxSeattle Cafe on the Water

We're pleased to be working with the World Trade Center Seattle on our first TEDxSeattle Cafe' of 2017, Compassion as a Power Tool on June 7th.

The cafe' format is a more casual opportunity to hear from a previous TEDxSeattle speaker, learn more about how the all-volunteer effort that is TEDxSeattle works as well as a chance to talk with fellow TEDx'ers.

Details:

When we think of power, we think of force. But is force always the best option? Not according to TEDx Speaker Tim Dawes. Join us the evening of June 7 for a special night when we’ll explore Tim’s compelling idea to use “Compassion as a Power Tool.” You’ll also learn how TEDx speakers are curated, and how you can partner with us to expand your reach.

Consultant, trainer and TEDxSeattle speaker Tim Dawes demonstrates the power of compassion to influence, lead, and create better outcomes in business and everyday life. Using remarkable true stories, Tim shows how re-imagining compassion as a practical set of skills enables us to shift our relationships with adversaries, collaborate, and quickly invent new options we might never have considered before.

In addition to hearing from Tim on compassion, guests will learn how TEDxSeattle’s team curates its speakers - a fascinating process alone. Joining Tim Dawes will be Lisa Phelps Dawes, Chief Storyteller at Storied Thoughts and Co-Chair of the TEDxSeattle Speaker Team. Lisa will share her expertise and insights into the curation process for TEDx programs. Using video for storytelling, Lisa has won more than two dozen international, national, and regional awards, including four Emmys. And, better still, these awards have earned market share and customers for her clients! 

If you’ve been wondering how to get your organization involved in the global TED movement on a regional level, this event is for you!


Nature's internet: how trees talk to each other in a healthy forest

This fascinating talk presents the scientific research that shows the interconnectedness of life in the forest ecosystem.

It takes us beneath the forest floor where we learn how trees are communicating and exchanging resources. Going beyond the simple view of a forest as a resource to be exploited, it presents the forest as a complex network of life. Her examination of the relationships that make up the complexity of nature present compelling support for the idea that “We are all one”


Empathy is Power

When we think of power, we think of force. But is force always the best option? Negotiator and trainer Tim Dawes demonstrates the power of compassion to influence, lead, and create better outcomes in business and everyday life. Using three remarkable and true stories, Tim shows how re-imagining compassion as a practical set of skills enables us to shift our relationships with adversaries, collaborate, and quickly invent new options we might never have considered before.

Negotiator and trainer Tim Dawes demonstrates the power of compassion to influence, lead, and create better outcomes in business and everyday life. Using three remarkable and true stories, Tim shows how re-imagining compassion as a practical set of skills enables us to shift our relationships with adversaries, collaborate, and quickly invent new options we might never have considered before.