Why the world needs your story

A filmmaker by accident, Eliaichi came to her story while exploring her Tanzanian roots. Her journey as a first-generation Asian-African American led her to ask questions never asked before. The answers shocked her and helped her see how sharing our stories can reshape lives.

Eliaichi Kimaro uses art and video to bring stories of struggle, resistance, and survival to a broader audience. She brings a lifetime of personal and professional experience exploring issues of culture, identity, race, class, gender and trauma to her Award-winning directorial debut, A Lot Like You. She is currently on the campus/conference lecture circuit, engaging with communities around the world about gender-based violence, global mixed race/multicultural issues, cultural identity and the power of personal storytelling.
Through her production company, 9elephants productions, she has produced over 80 videos for local and national non-profits working within underserved communities to address social and economic justice issues. Following her 5 year term as President of the Board at the NW Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian and Gay Survivors of Abuse, Kimaro joined the Board of the Seattle Globalist, a daily online publication dedicated to elevating diverse voices through media.


The life-changing power of live theater

For thousands of years, live theater has captivated the human mind. In this funny and revealing talk, Andrew shows why we respond so strongly to the stage and why recognizing its superpower is more important now than ever.


This judge wants to stop sending kids to jail: how we can help

As a Chief Justice in the juvenile court system, Wesley has come to believe the system is better at sentencing people than reducing crime. He asks that we rely less on the power of the justice system, and more on human connection with Restorative Practices as a solution.


What's wrong with dying?

The answer might seem simple, but in the hands of Lesley Hazleton, the question takes us on a surprisingly humorous and thought-provoking journey into what it would actually mean to live forever. And whether we’d truly want to. A frequent TED.com speaker and 'Accidental Theologist,' Hazleton uses wit and wisdom to challenge our ideas not only about death, but about what it is to live well.


Cubicles don't work. How architectural design affects your brain.

Scott explains how architectural design can solve--or make---problems. Citing shapes, materials and plants as just a few of the design elements that make a workspace truly work, he shows how his architecture firm's corporate projects designed with employees and the neighborhood in mind.


TEDxSeattle speaker Celeste Headlee on stage

Help make America talk again

This engaging talk shows how to have conversations with people you disagree with politically or otherwise. With numerous examples and insightful commentary, author, and journalist Celeste Headlee makes the case that we can talk with people who disagree with us, and we must.